Notes on Dance Musicality

          Dance is the physical expression of music. As you become more knowledgeable and experienced, you gradually begin to interpret the music with your body in the physical world. Great dancers have an amazing feeling for the music. To a beginner, the music blurs and is fast. To a great dancer, the music is quiet, understandable and suspended in time so it can be felt and responded to. The experienced dancer also easily commands all of his or her body so the body can be used in response to the music. The music can be seen in the dancer's body.

         It is quite obvious when new dancers move in a manner that is detached from the music. It's jerky. It's out of time and it's frequently not appropriate to the music. The new dancer is often preoccupied with learning the steps, learning the lead/follow and learning the movements. As an introspective new dancer dances, the body is more understood and becomes more controled. For many years I believed that looking in the mirror was a vain act. However, our body often does things that we are not aware of. Looking in the mirror coordinates the mind's interpretation with the body's movements. I learned that looking in the mirror while doing the Waltz allowed me to feel my head bobbing. Hours of practice in front of the mirror will teach my mind to know when my head is bobbing. The result is a mind that better controls the body. This will improve the aesthetics of the dance.

         Dance Musicality is feeling the music and incorporating the music in your movements. Essentially, your body, your mind and the music become one. The experience then feels good and you want more. For some people, I truly believe that there is an actual endorphin release the same way that runners experience a "runner's high".

Reading Music

          By the way, did I mention I was a dentist? If you need an Atlanta dancing dentist who loves creating beautiful smiles and making people happy, please visit my dental website at www.atlantadentist.com.

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